Japan wants to establish global standards for human-assisting robots

Japan has opened a consultation with the International Standards Organisation (ISO) in a bid to establish standards for human-assisting robots.

Part of the reason for Japan's huge investments into robotics is the country's ageing population. Robots designed to help the elderly are becoming increasingly commonplace.

Japan has already created a national standard for robot-to-human interactions across a large number of settings including medical, commercial, and...

Liberty wins first case banning police use of facial recognition

Human rights group Liberty has won the first international case banning the use of facial recognition technology for policing.

In a judgment today, the Court of Appeal ruled that South Wales Police’s use of facial recognition technology breaches privacy rights, data protection laws, and equality laws.

Liberty launched the case on behalf of Cardiff resident Ed Bridges who was scanned by the technology first on a busy Cardiff high street in December 2017, and again when...

Musk says Neuralink will solve a lot of brain and spine injuries

Elon Musk believes his ambitious computer-to-brain project, Neuralink, will solve a lot of brain and spine injuries.

Neuralink aims to achieve a symbiosis between AI and the human brain. First established in 2016, the project has been relatively quiet despite the company’s ~90 employees clearly working hard behind-the-scenes.

In a call-out on Twitter for engineers to join Neuralink, Musk highlighted what lifechanging results the work could...

Uber hit with lawsuit to reveal how its algorithm works

Uber has been hit with a lawsuit by two British drivers in a bid to reveal how the company’s algorithm works.

The headquarters for Uber in Europe is in Amsterdam, so the drivers have taken their case to a Dutch court.

Uber’s drivers want to know what data is being collected about them – and how it’s being used. The drivers are concerned that Uber’s algorithm isn’t entirely neutral in how it decides who to allocate rides to.

"They want to prove that...

Musk claims Tesla is ‘very close’ to achieving Level 5 autonomous driving

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has a more ambitious timescale in mind for achieving Level 5 autonomous driving than many other experts.

Level 5 self-driving is defined as requiring no human driver at any time, can drive in any city, and in any weather conditions. The previous level is considered “mind off” meaning that a human driver is rarely needed but may be required to intervene if driving in an unprogrammed area or in conditions such as snow.

“We overestimated the...

Waymo and Volvo establish partnership to build electric robotaxis

Waymo has formed a partnership with automotive giant Volvo to build electric robotaxis.

The companies announced the "exclusive" collaboration on Thursday which will see Waymo's self-driving software being integrated with an electric vehicle by Volvo designed for taxi purposes.

"Through our strategic partnership, we will first work together to integrate the Waymo Driver into an all-new mobility-focused electric vehicle platform for ride hailing services," the companies...

Congressman requests specifics of Amazon’s facial recognition pledge

California Congressman Jimmy Gomez has joined those sceptical of Amazon’s recent facial recognition pledge and has penned a letter to CEO Jeff Bezos asking for specifics.

“Corporations have been quick to share expressions of support for the Black Lives Matter movement following the public outrage over the murders of Black Americans like George Floyd at the hands of police,” said Congressman Gomez. “Unfortunately, too many of these gestures have been performative at...

IBM will no longer build facial recognition tech, sends letter to Congress

IBM has announced it will no longer build facial recognition amid growing concern over the technology’s implications.

In a letter to Congress, IBM CEO Arvind Krishna wrote:

“IBM firmly opposes and will not condone uses of any [facial recognition] technology, including facial recognition technology offered by other vendors, for mass surveillance, racial profiling, violations of basic human rights and freedoms, or any purpose which is not consistent with our values and...

IIHS: Self-driving cars would only prevent one-third of human crashes

Research conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has found that self-driving cars may not reduce crashes as much as hoped.

One of the touted benefits of autonomous vehicles is they do not suffer from the same issues as us humans. Tiredness, inebriation, or even a medical condition while at the wheel can often result in injury or fatalities for us mere mortals.

According to automotive safety experts, around 94 percent of crashes are caused by...

How IoT and AI can enable companies to restart their business during Covid-19

After months of extreme uncertainty, pause of economies and isolation in our homes, finally economies slowly restart their operations and transactions. However, this transition will not be smooth. There are many rules related to physical distance and hygiene as well as limitations which still force employers to ask their employees to work from home (for months). Of course, these rules are more than necessary so we can avoid the second wave of the pandemic, but there are some key concerns...