IoT rating system and expiry dates proposed by Australian government

Canberra, Australia

Increased regulation of IoT devices is amidst the suggestions of a new discussion paper from the Australian government.

The paper, which discusses methods to strengthen cybersecurity regulations, explores a variety of potential venues to either encourage or enforce businesses to invest more into preventing such threats.

"We believe that one reason that many smart devices are vulnerable is because competition in the market is primarily based on new features and cost," the...

UK plans laws to protect IoT devices following pandemic sales surge

The UK government plans to introduce laws designed to help protect IoT devices following a pandemic-induced surge in sales.

With more people spending time at home for both work and play, many have invested in smart devices to become more productive and make their lives easier. In fact, figures (PDF) commissioned by the government suggest that almost half (49%) of UK residents have purchased an IoT device since the start of the pandemic.

Dr Ian Levy, Technical Director of...

Liverpool to become a global drones leader following project launch

Liverpool is set to become a global leader in drones following the launch of a unique test and development area.

The project, a collaboration between the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority (LCRCA) and the Drone Major Group, is called Phoenix I and represents the first part of a larger initiative of interconnected projects designed to establish Liverpool as a leader in drones.

Steve Rotheram, Metro Mayor of the Liverpool City Region, said:

“The Liverpool...

Construction begins on £22.4 million National Robotarium in the UK

The UK has begun construction of a £22.4 million National Robotarium in Edinburgh which aims to solidify the country as a leader in AI and robotics.

UK Government Minister for Scotland Iain Stewart said:

“The creation of the UK’s first National Robotarium in Edinburgh will place Scotland at the forefront of a technological revolution that is changing the way we work.

This exciting new facility, supported by £21 million from the UK Government, will create...

Nuro receives first permit to operate self-driving cars commercially in California

California’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) has awarded Nuro the state’s first commercial permit for self-driving cars.

The permit allows Nuro to operate its autonomous vehicles commercially on the roads of two counties near the company’s Bay Area headquarters.

Nuro says it will soon announce its first commercial deployment with an “established” partner. The company’s fleet of Prius cars will kick-off the deployment but will later be joined by Nuro’s...

Opinion: 5G is not the cure for the economic downturn

The Spanish government has announced that its recovery plan will prioritise the digitalisation of cities, companies and the rural environment as it looks to reform the country's economy in the wake of the pandemic. In this spirit, European recovery funds will be aimed at meeting the challenges of improving digitalisation, which are not exclusive to Spain but to all members of the European Union. Across the continent, there is a common agenda: fight against depopulation, transition to a...

Uber and Lyft lose appeal to avoid classifying drivers as employees

Uber and Lyft have been ordered to classify their drivers as employees by a Californian court after losing an appeal.

The ride-hailing giants classify their drivers as contractors which means they can avoid giving many of the usual rights and benefits afforded to employees. Uber and Lyft argue most drivers prefer the flexibility of so-called gig economy work.

Most groups representing drivers for the companies appear to be in favour of them being classed as employees....

WEF: Inequality likely to worsen as robots set to do half of work by 2025

A report from the World Economic Forum (WEF) predicts that robots will do half of all work tasks by 2025, with inequality likely to worsen as a result.

Concerns about the impact of automation on jobs are not exactly new, but most felt the timeline for significant change would be longer – providing more time for mass reskilling of the workforce.

The pandemic we find ourselves in is creating “a double disruption of jobs” with businesses reducing their employees while...

Japan wants to establish global standards for human-assisting robots

Japan has opened a consultation with the International Standards Organisation (ISO) in a bid to establish standards for human-assisting robots.

Part of the reason for Japan's huge investments into robotics is the country's ageing population. Robots designed to help the elderly are becoming increasingly commonplace.

Japan has already created a national standard for robot-to-human interactions across a large number of settings including medical, commercial, and...

Liberty wins first case banning police use of facial recognition

Human rights group Liberty has won the first international case banning the use of facial recognition technology for policing.

In a judgment today, the Court of Appeal ruled that South Wales Police’s use of facial recognition technology breaches privacy rights, data protection laws, and equality laws.

Liberty launched the case on behalf of Cardiff resident Ed Bridges who was scanned by the technology first on a busy Cardiff high street in December 2017, and again when...