Opinion: 5G is not the cure for the economic downturn

The Spanish government has announced that its recovery plan will prioritise the digitalisation of cities, companies and the rural environment as it looks to reform the country's economy in the wake of the pandemic. In this spirit, European recovery funds will be aimed at meeting the challenges of improving digitalisation, which are not exclusive to Spain but to all members of the European Union. Across the continent, there is a common agenda: fight against depopulation, transition to a...

Uber and Lyft lose appeal to avoid classifying drivers as employees

Uber and Lyft have been ordered to classify their drivers as employees by a Californian court after losing an appeal.

The ride-hailing giants classify their drivers as contractors which means they can avoid giving many of the usual rights and benefits afforded to employees. Uber and Lyft argue most drivers prefer the flexibility of so-called gig economy work.

Most groups representing drivers for the companies appear to be in favour of them being classed as employees....

WEF: Inequality likely to worsen as robots set to do half of work by 2025

A report from the World Economic Forum (WEF) predicts that robots will do half of all work tasks by 2025, with inequality likely to worsen as a result.

Concerns about the impact of automation on jobs are not exactly new, but most felt the timeline for significant change would be longer – providing more time for mass reskilling of the workforce.

The pandemic we find ourselves in is creating “a double disruption of jobs” with businesses reducing their employees while...

Japan wants to establish global standards for human-assisting robots

Japan has opened a consultation with the International Standards Organisation (ISO) in a bid to establish standards for human-assisting robots.

Part of the reason for Japan's huge investments into robotics is the country's ageing population. Robots designed to help the elderly are becoming increasingly commonplace.

Japan has already created a national standard for robot-to-human interactions across a large number of settings including medical, commercial, and...

Liberty wins first case banning police use of facial recognition

Human rights group Liberty has won the first international case banning the use of facial recognition technology for policing.

In a judgment today, the Court of Appeal ruled that South Wales Police’s use of facial recognition technology breaches privacy rights, data protection laws, and equality laws.

Liberty launched the case on behalf of Cardiff resident Ed Bridges who was scanned by the technology first on a busy Cardiff high street in December 2017, and again when...

The EU launches ‘sector inquiry’ into the Internet of Things

The European Union loves antitrust inquiries and so it’s launching one into the entire consumer Internet of Things (IoT) sector.

EU lawmakers are concerned about the huge amounts of data being collected about consumers through IoT devices.

Margrethe Vestager, the EU’s competition commissioner, said:

“Voice assistants and smart devices can collect a vast amount of data about our habits. And there's a risk that big companies could misuse the data collected...

Congressman requests specifics of Amazon’s facial recognition pledge

California Congressman Jimmy Gomez has joined those sceptical of Amazon’s recent facial recognition pledge and has penned a letter to CEO Jeff Bezos asking for specifics.

“Corporations have been quick to share expressions of support for the Black Lives Matter movement following the public outrage over the murders of Black Americans like George Floyd at the hands of police,” said Congressman Gomez. “Unfortunately, too many of these gestures have been performative at...