WEF: Inequality likely to worsen as robots set to do half of work by 2025

A report from the World Economic Forum (WEF) predicts that robots will do half of all work tasks by 2025, with inequality likely to worsen as a result.

Concerns about the impact of automation on jobs are not exactly new, but most felt the timeline for significant change would be longer – providing more time for mass reskilling of the workforce.

The pandemic we find ourselves in is creating “a double disruption of jobs” with businesses reducing their employees while...

Arm unveils new solutions for IoT and automotive applications

Arm has unveiled new computing solutions designed for improving autonomy in IoT and automotive settings.

Arm has announced a suite of new IP including the Arm Cortex-A78AE CPU, Mali-G78AE GPU, and Mali-C71AE ISP. Each will work in tandem with supporting software and tools to enhance the autonomous workload capabilities of silicon providers and OEMs.

Chet Babla, VP of Automotive and IoT at Arm, said:

“Autonomy has the potential to improve every aspect of our...

Experts believe Industry 4.0 will drive a century of advancements over five years

The majority of IT experts believe a century’s worth of technological advancements will happen over the next five years.

Four in five (82%) senior IT decision-makers (ITDMs) worldwide make the prediction as part of Industry 4.0 research conducted by Quadrant Strategies.

Industry 4.0 is the idea that we’re entering the fourth industrial revolution—driven by technologies such as large-scale M2M communications, the IoT, and AI.

The vast majority (87%) of...

Japan wants to establish global standards for human-assisting robots

Japan has opened a consultation with the International Standards Organisation (ISO) in a bid to establish standards for human-assisting robots.

Part of the reason for Japan's huge investments into robotics is the country's ageing population. Robots designed to help the elderly are becoming increasingly commonplace.

Japan has already created a national standard for robot-to-human interactions across a large number of settings including medical, commercial, and...

Liberty wins first case banning police use of facial recognition

Human rights group Liberty has won the first international case banning the use of facial recognition technology for policing.

In a judgment today, the Court of Appeal ruled that South Wales Police’s use of facial recognition technology breaches privacy rights, data protection laws, and equality laws.

Liberty launched the case on behalf of Cardiff resident Ed Bridges who was scanned by the technology first on a busy Cardiff high street in December 2017, and again when...

Musk says Neuralink will solve a lot of brain and spine injuries

Elon Musk believes his ambitious computer-to-brain project, Neuralink, will solve a lot of brain and spine injuries.

Neuralink aims to achieve a symbiosis between AI and the human brain. First established in 2016, the project has been relatively quiet despite the company’s ~90 employees clearly working hard behind-the-scenes.

In a call-out on Twitter for engineers to join Neuralink, Musk highlighted what lifechanging results the work could...

Uber hit with lawsuit to reveal how its algorithm works

Uber has been hit with a lawsuit by two British drivers in a bid to reveal how the company’s algorithm works.

The headquarters for Uber in Europe is in Amsterdam, so the drivers have taken their case to a Dutch court.

Uber’s drivers want to know what data is being collected about them – and how it’s being used. The drivers are concerned that Uber’s algorithm isn’t entirely neutral in how it decides who to allocate rides to.

"They want to prove that...

IBM will no longer build facial recognition tech, sends letter to Congress

IBM has announced it will no longer build facial recognition amid growing concern over the technology’s implications.

In a letter to Congress, IBM CEO Arvind Krishna wrote:

“IBM firmly opposes and will not condone uses of any [facial recognition] technology, including facial recognition technology offered by other vendors, for mass surveillance, racial profiling, violations of basic human rights and freedoms, or any purpose which is not consistent with our values and...

IIHS: Self-driving cars would only prevent one-third of human crashes

Research conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has found that self-driving cars may not reduce crashes as much as hoped.

One of the touted benefits of autonomous vehicles is they do not suffer from the same issues as us humans. Tiredness, inebriation, or even a medical condition while at the wheel can often result in injury or fatalities for us mere mortals.

According to automotive safety experts, around 94 percent of crashes are caused by...

Siri whistleblower goes public following inaction against Apple

A whistleblower who revealed Apple contractors were listening in on Siri recordings has gone public following a lack of action against the company.

Thomas le Bonniec, a former Apple contractor at the firm's Cork office in Ireland, believes that the company should be held legally responsible for breaching users' privacy.

Le Bonniec was employed by Apple to transcribe recordings in both English and French but left the company over ethical concerns.

The...